back to article NASA, USAF in $30m hypersonic boffinry push

The US air force and NASA have launched a joint research push to advance hypersonic flight technology. The air force research lab and space agency are seeking university and industry partners, and are offering $30m in funding. Hypersonic for this purpose is defined as five times the speed of sound or faster. Thus far, very few …

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  1. Tom Chiverton Silver badge
    Boffin

    Pedant point

    "Hypersonic for this purpose is defined as five times the speed of sound or faster"

    The speed of sound *in what* ?

  2. Secretgeek
    Thumb Up

    Two things.

    Firstly the serious one - $30 million? Isn't that pocket change to these establishments? Given that, as intimated in the article, the issues to be overcome will require significant research and advances in multiple areas including materials technology and chemistry, $30 mill really seems like a let's throw a few coppers out there and see what comes back kind of plan. Good luck with that.

    Second - 'slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard' - I love, I'm going to use it.

  3. Bayleaf

    Lunchtime

    "The Pentagon's famous bad-boy scientists, DARPA* - who slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard ".

    Do you deliberately wait until lunchtime before you post these articles - you must have shares in a keyboard manufacturer,

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Getting over the Humph

    > slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard

    Somebody's been listening to Just a Minute

  5. Lewis Page (Written by Reg staff)

    Just a minute

    No I haven't. The fellow routinely steals my ideas in advance.

  6. Mitchell Fraser

    @Chiverton

    The speed of sound in whatever you are flying through.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Thumb Up

    > slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard

    I'm keeping that one in my notes.

    Thanks!

  8. John
    Coat

    @Pedant point

    "the speed of sound *in what*?"

    In metres per second, presumably.

    Although, being American, they probably express it in some bonkers mediaeval measure such as acres per square pound.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Speed of sound

    Is generally accepted as being approximately 762 mph at sea level (I know... it's a measurement though, I doubt anyone's done that, or survived if they did) at STP.

    Better expressed as a Mach number - for example, the transitional value for the Hypersonic transition is < Mach 5

    What's the difference? Well, Mach numbers are effectively dimensonles numbers. Which can clarify the math somewhat.

  10. Paul R
    Coat

    @Tom Chiverton

    I just developed a system that allows me to travel at more than five times the speed of sound... in a vacuum. What do I win?

  11. Fluffykins

    @ Paul R

    A SHEEP!

    Actually, its been a while since the RSU (Reg System of Units) had an airing.

    and, @ AC - Wasn't there a land speed record attempt fairly recently that busted the sound barrier? At STP? And the driver survived?

    If that doesn't slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard, I dunno what does

  12. jim parker

    Getting over the Humph

    I think you mean Humphs wonderful exit lines from "I'm sorry I haven't a clue"

  13. mr_greedy
    Go

    Can we have our British hypersonic spaceplane now?

    Remember the Skylon?

    http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/skylon_overview.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylon

  14. Jason Harvey
    Coat

    to infinity and beyond!

    faster... faster...

    mines the one with the NASA badge on the shoulder

  15. Steve May

    Very very fast indeed

    I believe this record still stands.

    ProjectSageburner

    http://steeljawscribe.com/2007/03/23/flightdeck-friday-the-yf4h-1-phantom-ii-operations-skyburner-and-sageburner

    I also believe this record cannot now be competed for, 'cause it's too damn dangerous.

  16. Jesse
    Stop

    Counter pedant point

    You already know 'what' based on the context. If not, this article is already above your education level.

  17. Warhelmet
    Black Helicopters

    Skylon?

    Oh, but even before Skylon...

    HOTOL and before that things like the Hawker Siddeley APD.1019/H1 - designed to be capable of Mach 10.

  18. Chris G Silver badge

    Plagiarists?

    Maybe Darpa already has all of Alan Bond's research to hand and in due course will present it as their own. It wouldn't be the first time that the tea dumpers have claimed British developments for their own.

  19. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    I've got to say it

    "who slap the pendulous jowls of established wisdom with the gauntlet of disregard"

    Priceless !!

  20. Steve
    Coat

    Re: Speed of sound?

    Ah, but is it an African or European sound?

    Mine's the one with shrubbery in the pcoket....

  21. Lee Humphries
    Go

    Hypersonics for $2million

    Why they seem to keep ignoring these guys is beyond me. Maybe its the fact it wasn't made in the US, didn't cost enough, or that they're trying to use off the shelf componentry. Anyway, they still beat NASA to a working scramjet.

    http://www.uq.edu.au/hypersonics/?page=19501

    http://www.abc.net.au/science/slab/hyshot/default.htm

  22. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    So, much money.

    The copious amount of money they spend on these things, could be spent getting research done into what has not been done before.

    Principle: research, develop, prove, patent, adopt for whatever project and license. Prove the basic grounds and elements one at a time for the project and use and work up until you have enough for the actually project. Think small, think simple, practical steps. Be innovative and work out the practical (is that allowed).

    And don't try to spend copious amounts of money trying to prove there used to be bacterial life on mars, find something more useful, like drive research that will allow you to do much more research much cheaper for even similar amounts of money that you would have spent trying to do it with present technologies into the distant future.

    Wayne Morellini.

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